How Internet Marketing / Websites Can Help Grow Your Business

One of the biggest problems I hear from clients is that they are so busy working in their business, they don’t have time to work on it.

Now, you’re probably thinking “Between taking care of clients, answering email and putting out fires, where do I find time work on my own business?”

The answer is simple…

Automate your marketing and sales campaigns so your business starts growing on its own.

And if you’ve got a Website, chances are you’re already halfway there.

Here are Seven Ways Your Website Can Grow Your Business for You:

1) Powerful Introductions
2) Draw in the Crowds
3) Make Sales Without Selling
4) Give ‘Em a Taste
5) Build Your List
6) Deliver the Goods
7) Following Up Forever

Remember, you don’t have to learn how to set all this up yourself. You just have to know what needs to be done. Then hire us to do the time-consuming, technical and complicated work for you. 🙂

http://www.aryancreative.com/

Mobile: +91-9001491799

Thank you,
Shankar

Aryan Creative Agency Work Process

Aryan Creative Agency Work Process
Discovery

We start by collecting assets, understanding the project scope, interviewing users, and asking targeted questions to help determine the emotion of the brand.

RESEARCH

We like to dig deep to understand the industry, competition, and analagous concepts across verticals.

INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE

After all components of the application have been compiled, I break that down into naturally occurring categories and priority.

MESSAGING

For marketing pages, We treat the messaging with my proven formula to capture the user’s attention, drive up their interest, and get them to convert. Within the application, we clearly explain what the user can achieve on each interface.

SKETCH

All of previous components are taken through a bunch of iterations on paper while We  explore to find the best flow and design patterns for the site or application.

MOCKUP

The sketches are brought to life in high-fidelity mockups, which will be presented for feedback. Iterations follow.

CODE

When mockups are approved we  get busy cranking out efficient and reusable code to add the magic that makes the application work.

ZOOM. ENHANCE.

Depending on the scope of the project, this is where we really make things shine; adding animations, transitions, and other components to improve the user’s experience.

USER TESTING

The most important part of the process is seeing how the users react. we  use various tools to record the interaction of users within the app, as well as talk directly to customers to get their feedback.

10 Web Design Trends for 2014

  • 1. CONTENT FIRST
  • 2. SIMPLICITY OF DESIGN INTERACTION AND CONTENT
  • 3. UX CENTERED DESIGN
  • 4. APP STYLE INTERFACES
  • 5. THE UNIFICATION OF DESKTOP AND MOBILE INTO A SINGLE VERSION
  • 6. SVG AND RESPONSIVE TECHNIQUES
  • 7. FLAT COLORS AND NO MORE SKEUOMORPHISM
  • 8. TECHNOLOGY AGNOSTIC
  • 9. EXPERIMENTATION AND INNOVATION IN DEVICE SENSORS AND INTERACTION
  • 10. THE INTERNET OF THINGS

Fixed Navigation Bars: Pros and Cons

Fixed or “sticky” navigation bars are a prevalent trend in some of the most shockingly beautiful sites across the web. These benignly set bars allow for ease of access to a website’s core functionalities, regardless of where a user may be in the midst of a page’s content. Yet there are more than a few critics of the fixed bar model. The most common complaints include words like: “unnecessary” and “distracting” pitched about in regular intervals.

Truthfully there are merits to both sides of the argument, and the proper use of fixed navigation bars remains a contextual and subjective matter. In other words, it’s largely a question of user preference that determines a fixed navigation bar’s effect on usability.

There are, however, distinct advantages and disadvantages to their use. Today we’ll take a gander at both sides of the argument and attempt to decipher the best and worst uses of this particular trend.

PROS

Advantages in usability

The advantages to fixed navigation bars should be obvious. They, quite simply, make browsing a website far easier. Having a main menu of options at your immediate disposal is a major feather in the impatient user’s cap, especially if the website has an exhaustive amount of content contained within.

This is important for several reasons, but chief among them is speed. Quick and easy flow through a website is extremely important. With an ever-present guidepost fixed at the top or side of the screen, a site owner never need worry about his or her user flows being dammed up by confusion or immobility.

This is particularly significant when dealing with copious amounts of content. Famous examples of this concept come in the form of everyone’s favorite social media platforms: Facebook and Twitter. Both sites feature news feeds with nigh infinite information loading up at the bottom of the screen.

Responsive Design: A hard job ahead

If we think we can complete a responsive project working only with media-queries, grids and flexible images, we’re only doing half the job, and definitely not a great job! For any web designer, thinking responsive means accepting a new challenge: to be creative not only to produce something that works well on desktop PCs, but also on tablets and smartphones; to create new designs for each device and not just to adapt the initial one, that’s wouldn’t be enough. Last generation tablets and smartphones have a special feature: the touch-screen, this leads us to focus on the optimization of our designs more than we did in the past when we only had to think of desktop versions of websites.

Responsive Design: One Design for Each Job: Not Enough!

The responsive approach begins to make it’s way, users appreciate the advantages, designers and developers around the world support it. If we’re lucky enough to meet a client who wants to produce his or her site with this technology, we should be happy because we have the opportunity to work on a modern project. But we must also be concerned that when working on a good responsive project, work is harder and it’s hard to convince a customer to pay more for a responsive site than for a normal site. We can push the client to pay more if they propose to develop a dedicated mobile site or application for iPad, but this isn’t our case. We want our project to be “cross-device” and “avaiable in all sizes.”

 

Responsive web design

The future of the web is mobile. So it’s important that your web endeavors not only consider mobile viewing, but that they actually take a mobile first approach that is responsive to whatever device your audience is viewing your site. We call this “responsive web design.” Having a site that knows what device is accessing it and customizing the experience for that device creates seamless interactions for all of your visitors.